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CCES Alert Regarding NSF International Study on Nutritional Supplement Called Craze

release by CCES

October 30, 2013 (Ottawa, Ontario) – The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES) would like to alert the sport community about the findings of a study conducted by NSF International, Harvard Medical School and the National Institute for Public Health and Environment, on a nutritional supplement called Craze.

According to the research, Craze, by Driven Sports, contains a substance called N,alpha-diethylphenylethylamine (N,a-DEPEA) which is not listed on the label and “has a structure similar to methamphetamine.”

A link to the article outlining the results of the study can be found at www.nsf.org/newsroom/emerging-and-potentially-harmful-adulterant-depea-found-in-supplements.

The CCES believes the use of most supplements poses an unacceptable risk for athletes and their athletic career. Ultimately, athletes are responsible for any prohibited substance that may be found in their sample; this is known as strict liability. If athletes who use supplements test positive for a prohibited substance, this can result in a violation being declared, regardless of how the prohibited substance got into their body. Serious sanctions may be imposed.

For more information on supplements, visit www.cces.ca/en/supplements.

The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport is an independent, national, not-for-profit organization. We recognize that true sport can make a great difference for individuals, communities and our country. We are committed to working collaboratively to activate a values-based and principle-driven sport system; protecting the integrity of sport from the negative forces of doping and other unethical threats; and advocating for sport that is fair, safe and open to everyone.





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